[abstract]CENTERS CAPABLE OF TREATING HYPERBARIC EMERGENCIES IN CALIFORNIA

Rubicon Research Repository/Manakin Repository

[abstract]CENTERS CAPABLE OF TREATING HYPERBARIC EMERGENCIES IN CALIFORNIA

Show full item record


Title: [abstract]CENTERS CAPABLE OF TREATING HYPERBARIC EMERGENCIES IN CALIFORNIA
Author: Chin W; Yang K; Talati N; Miya J; Uner A; Gustavson R; Sprau S; Jacoby R
Abstract: Introduction/Background: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is the primary treatment for arterial gas embolism, decompression sickness and acute carbon monoxide poisoning. Though there has been a proliferation of hyperbaric centers throughout the United States, a scarcity of centers equipped to treat emergency indications makes transport of patients necessary. To locate and characterize hyperbaric centers capable of treating emergency cases, a survey of centers throughout California was conducted. Materials and methods: Using the UHMS Hyperbaric Chamber Directory, 43 centers were located, and 34 were successfully contacted. The survey assessed chamber readiness to respond to emergency indications. Criteria included ability to treat patients requiring ventilators or intravenous drug infusion, presence of 24-hour on-call staff, and number of cases of arterial gas embolism, decompression sickness, and carbon monoxide poisoning treated within the last year. The survey determined how many centers had the capacity to treat emergencies. Results: Out of 34 centers contacted, seven (20.6 percent) were equipped to handle emergency indications. These were centers that reported the ability to treat patients requiring ventilators and intravenous drug infusion, as well as the availability of a 24-hour on-call staff. Of these, three were multiplace and four were monoplace. Centers were located in the following counties: Los Angeles (4), San Bernardino (1), San Diego (1), San Francisco (1). Conclusions: The relative scarcity of emergency-ready centers necessitates patient transport to alternate facilities. Transportation of patients comes with various risks, depending on the mode of transportation. Risks include hypoxia, expansion of gases, anxiety and vehicle crashes. Additionally, transport delays hyperbaric treatment, which can cause therapy to be less effective and increase risk of residual symptoms and fatality. To reduce the need for inter-facility transport of emergency cases, existing centers must be incentivized to become capable of treating these patients.
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine : Journal of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc.
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/10551
Date: 2012

Files in this item

Files Size Format View
abstract.txt 258bytes Text file View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

Show full item record

Browse

My Account