[abstract] TRANSPORT OF CARBON MONOXIDE-POISONED PATIENTS ENROLLED IN A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL.

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[abstract] TRANSPORT OF CARBON MONOXIDE-POISONED PATIENTS ENROLLED IN A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL.

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Title: [abstract] TRANSPORT OF CARBON MONOXIDE-POISONED PATIENTS ENROLLED IN A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL.
Author: Weaver, LK; Haberstock, D; Churchill, S
Abstract: BACKGROUND: In a recent RCT of HBO2 v. NBO2 for acute CO poisoning1 concerns about using HBO2 have been raised because of transport risk.2-4 Therefore, we decided to report transport information from this trial.1 MATERIALS AND METHODS: A chart review was performed on 152 patient charts to ascertain how the patient entered the medical system, mode of transport, distance, and medical complications. RESULTS: Initial contact: Patient calls (36/152), non-patient calls (69/152). Initial calls: EMS (82/152), family (10/152), poison control (7/152), and Emergency Departments (ED) (6/152). With EMS activation, the patient typically had ground transport to an ED (75/152), or directly to the chamber (36/152). One patient refused the ambulance transport because of cost. Four patients were instructed to self-transport to the ED by EMS. Of those evaluated in the ED many had another transport to the chamber facility - by ground (99), helicopter (8), or fixed wing aircraft (6). The distance from the location of the poisoning to the initial ED was 32.7+/-51.6 miles (range =1-295 miles). For those patients brought directly from the scene to the chamber facility, the distance was 10.6+/-28.2 miles (range =2-172 miles). For the entire group the total distance traveled from the location of the poisoning to the hyperbaric facility was 38.3+/-57.2 (range=2-369 miles). Five patients were intubated at the scene and transported by: helicopter (1/5), ambulance (2/5), fixed wing aircraft (1/5). One patient had helicopter, ambulance and fixed wing transport to the hyperbaric facility. Three patients were intubated in the first ED, and subsequently transported to the chamber facility by helicopter (1/3), ambulance (1/3), or fixed wing aircraft (1/3). There were no medical misadventures related to transport of patents to a medical facility. CONCLUSIONS: Ground and air transport was safe for CO poisoned patients by medical transports in the Intermountain West. 1 Weaver NEJM; 2002; 347:1057-67. 2 Thom SR (editorial). NEJM 2002;347: 1105-6. 3 de Pont AC, et al. (letter). NEJM 2003; In press. 4 Finnerty J. (letter). NEJM 2003; In press. Supported by Deseret Foundation Grants, LDS Hospital ( 247, 275, 305).
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org )
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/1359
Date: 2003

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  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

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