[abstract] RESULTS OF DIVERS ALERT NETWORK DIVING INCIDENT REPORT SURVEY

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[abstract] RESULTS OF DIVERS ALERT NETWORK DIVING INCIDENT REPORT SURVEY

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Title: [abstract] RESULTS OF DIVERS ALERT NETWORK DIVING INCIDENT REPORT SURVEY
Author: Uguccioni, DM; Pollock, NW
Abstract: BACKGROUND: A challenge in studying safety patterns is the difficulty in collecting information on non-fatal incidents, particularly those resolved through the immediate action of participants, thus avoiding outside intervention. The Divers Alert Network initiated a survey in 1994 to gather information on non-fatal diving incidents. METHODS: The Diving Incident Report Survey was posted on the DAN website and included in the organization s bimonthly publication. Responses were encouraged from participants in non-fatal incidents or from those observing them. The survey included 35 questions/fields. It could be completed in as little as 5-10 minutes, the biggest time variable being the open narrative section. Completed surveys did not necessarily include data in all fields. RESULTS: 454 surveys contained sufficient data for analysis of multiple fields. Incidents were reported from 40 countries, 49percent from the United States. Surveys described incidents involving the reporter (54percent), the reporter's buddy (15percent) or other observed divers (31percent). Incidents were considered preventable in 77percent of cases. Most persons involved were male (69percent). The mean (+/-SD [range]) age of persons involved was 39+/-12 (12-82) years. Seventy-two percent held open water or advanced open water certification. Incidents occurred during training activity in 11percent of cases. The most common problems were: out-of-air (22percent), rapid ascent (18percent), lost buddy (13percent) and omitted decompression (6percent). Dives were aborted in one-third of reported cases and unaffected in another one-third. Respondents identified a median of two (0-11) factors contributing to incidents. The most common contributing factors were: error in judgment/incorrect decisions (12percent), inexperience in diving (11percent), malfunction or failure of equipment (8percent), and failure to check equipment (8percent). CONCLUSIONS: While information on fatal accidents is commonly gathered, limited data are available concerning non-fatal, particularly self-managed, incidents. The collection/dissemination of such information may increase the understanding of risks and facilitate efforts to optimize safety practices.
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org )
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/1783
Date: 2005

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  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

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