Magnetic field effects on dental amalgam in divers welding and cutting electrically underwater

Rubicon Research Repository/Manakin Repository

Magnetic field effects on dental amalgam in divers welding and cutting electrically underwater

Show full item record


Title: Magnetic field effects on dental amalgam in divers welding and cutting electrically underwater
Author: Ortendahl, TW; Hogstedt, P
Abstract: Divers have for some years been complaining about a metallic taste in the mouth while electrically welding and cutting underwater. This paper reports on results from an assessment of this problem. It was hypothesized that the magnetic fields arising from the welding or cutting current could correlate with the reported symptoms. The intraoral magnetic flux density was calculated to 1.15 mT, at 650 ADC, in a normal cutting situation. This was verified in vivo. This magnetic field was shown to contain an AC component that is a candidate for inducing secondary currents in the oral tissues and restorative materials. Five submerged divers exposed to a magnetic field of 0.35 mT did not report any metallic taste. Magnetophosphenes were reported by 1 diver. (Magnetophosphenes are luminous impressions due to excitement of the retina by a magnetic field in addition to or in place of impingement of light rays.) Only a slight shielding effect to magnetic fields was observed due to a copper-brass helmet. An in vitro model for exposure of dental amalgams to magnetic fields was designed. Recommendations for decreasing the magnetic field surrounding the diver in practical work is given.
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org )
URI: PMID: 3227576
http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/2486
Date: 1988

Files in this item

Files Size Format View
3227576.pdf 1.985Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Undersea Biomedical Research Journal
    The Undersea Baromedical Research journal was published by the Undersea Medical Society, Inc. (now the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society) quarterly from 1974 to 1992 when the name changed to the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine Journal.

Show full item record

Browse

My Account