The kangaroo rat as a model for type I decompression sickness

Rubicon Research Repository/Manakin Repository

The kangaroo rat as a model for type I decompression sickness

Show full item record


Title: The kangaroo rat as a model for type I decompression sickness
Author: Hills, BA; Butler, BD
Abstract: This study involved 720 exposures of 70 kangaroo rats trapped in West Texas and showed that decompression-induced tail biting in this animal provides a good animal model for marginal limb bends in man. That this phenomenon can be reversed by recompression and pathological examination of the tail both indicated that a similar mechanism is probably involved in kangaroo rats and humans. Quantitatively, the most susceptible 20percent of kangaroo rats can reproduce the no-stop decompression limits for man for exposure times ranging from 5 min to 8 h, for both air and helium-oxygen. Even the average minimum no-tail-biting depth of 46.2 fsw (2.40 ATA) for this species is much closer to the minimum bends depth of man than to the equivalent depth for other animals of its size, and is as good as the goats'. Its size and habits make the kangaroo rat much more convenient than other animals to use as a model for marginal decompression sickness, and particularly attractive economically for testing long helium-oxygen schedules and other means of decompression sickness prevention. Animals Behavior, Animal/physiology Decompression Sickness/pathology/*physiopathology/veterinary Dipodomys/*physiology *Disease Models, Animal Gases Rodent Diseases/pathology/physiopathology Rodentia/*physiology Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S. Tail/pathology Time Factors
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org )
URI: PMID: 734799
http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/2811
Date: 1978

Files in this item

Files Size Format View
734799.pdf 1.943Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Undersea Biomedical Research Journal
    The Undersea Baromedical Research journal was published by the Undersea Medical Society, Inc. (now the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society) quarterly from 1974 to 1992 when the name changed to the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine Journal.

Show full item record

Browse

My Account