Separation of basic parameters of decompression using fingerling salmon

Rubicon Research Repository/Manakin Repository

Separation of basic parameters of decompression using fingerling salmon

Show full item record


Title: Separation of basic parameters of decompression using fingerling salmon
Author: D'Aoust, BG; Stayton, L; Smith, LS
Abstract: The experimental limitations inherent in use of air-breathing vertebrates for studies of decompression are chiefly due to the difficulty in estimating supersaturation levels associated with both symptoms of decompression sickness and bubble formation. The difficulty is because gas elimination begins upon reduction of pressure and therefore complicates any estimates of the supersaturations that promoted the bubbles or symptoms, or both, in the first place. Use of physostomatous fish such as salmonid fingerlings easily available from hatcheries allows decompression of both fish and surrounding water, thereby minimizing gas tension gradients from the fish to the water and the water to the fish. Depending upon the experimental conditions imposed, the important physical properties such as diffusivity and solubility of different diving gases, H2, Ne, He, and N2, can be separated or combined parametrically. Results of these studies indicate that initial bubble formation in vivo is relatively independent of solubility, whereas the bubble growth phase is more dependent on gas concentration. Animals Argon Atmospheric Pressure Decompression Sickness/*physiopathology *Disease Models, Animal Helium Neon Nitrogen Salmon/*physiology Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org )
URI: PMID: 7423658
http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/2869
Date: 1980

Files in this item

Files Size Format View
7423658.pdf 1.677Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Undersea Biomedical Research Journal
    The Undersea Baromedical Research journal was published by the Undersea Medical Society, Inc. (now the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society) quarterly from 1974 to 1992 when the name changed to the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine Journal.

Show full item record

Browse

My Account