[abstract] HYPERBARIC LASER DOPPLER BLOOD PERFUSION MONITOR (BPM) DATA INTERPRETATION

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[abstract] HYPERBARIC LASER DOPPLER BLOOD PERFUSION MONITOR (BPM) DATA INTERPRETATION

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Title: [abstract] HYPERBARIC LASER DOPPLER BLOOD PERFUSION MONITOR (BPM) DATA INTERPRETATION
Author: Howe, S; Weaver, LK; Haberstock, D
Abstract: BACKGROUND: BPM is a non-invasive method of measuring flow, volume and velocity of blood. It may be a useful tool to inspect local (microcirculatory) perfusion and vasoconstriction. How it performs within the hyperbaric environment and its interpretation is currently under investigation. BPM flowmetry lends information about the perfusion of tissues directly around the sensor to a depth of 0.6 mm. Under HBO2 conditions, it is possible to have hyperoxygenated tissues although the tissue is poorly perfused. Hyperoxia may even lead to decreased perfusion due to autonomic vasoconstriction. We sought to examine effects of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) on local perfusion using BPM in the Sechrist hyperbaric chamber. METHODS: LDS Hospital IRB approved the BPM use for normal subjects exposed to HBO2. A BPM flow meter (Vasamedics, St. Paul, MN) right angle optical sensor 'cable' was passed through the hatch of a Sechrist monoplace hyperbaric chamber, along with two Radiometer (Westlake, OH) Tina 3( sensors. To date, we have recorded chamber pressure, BPM data and transcutaneous oxygen (TCM) data from five subjects. RESULTS: Chamber pressure, TCM and BPM data were collected and graphed. TCM oxygen rose and fell with the partial pressure of oxygen. Blood flow, volume and velocity fluctuated rapidly around relatively constant mean values. CONCLUSIONS: TCM measurements give rapid indication of the oxygenation of the underlying tissues. At this time, no direct correlation can be seen between TCM and BPM. Blood flow, volume and velocity measurements vary continuously, possibly due to noise or pulsatile flow. Mean perfusion trends, while relatively constant during a hyperbaric exposure, can show rapid changes (in the order of minutes) but these appear based upon anxiety or autoregulation, rather than hyperoxygenation. While our small sample size limits firm conclusions, initial data suggests that cutaneous vasoconstriction does not occur in response to HBO2 exposure in humans (within the volume of tissue sampled by the probe). At present, we consider this tool investigational, but it may hold promise in exploring aspects of physiology and healing.
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org )
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/287
Date: 1997

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  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

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