Ventilatory and occlusion-pressure responses to hypercapnia in divers and non-divers

Rubicon Research Repository/Manakin Repository

Ventilatory and occlusion-pressure responses to hypercapnia in divers and non-divers

Show full item record


Title: Ventilatory and occlusion-pressure responses to hypercapnia in divers and non-divers
Author: Sherman, D; Eilender, E; Shefer, A; Kerem, D
Abstract: Ventilatory (VE/PCO2) and occlusion-pressure (P0.1/PCO2) responses to progressive hypercapnia (rebreathing method of Read (1)) were estimated in 20 normal subjects and 22 scuba divers. Indexes of CO2 sensitivity (slopes of response curves) and absolute response values under strong CO2 drive (PCO2 = 60 mmHg) were significantly lower in the diver group. Individual CO2 sensitivity did not correlate with either diving experience or current diving activity. Positively skewed (log-normal) frequency distribution curves of individual CO2 sensitivities were drawn for the divers and for a larger sample of normal controls (using data from other studies). All divers' values fell in the lower range of non-diver control values and about one-third were below the normal range (mean +/- 2 SD) for CO2 sensitivity. We concluded that our divers did not represent a distinct population different from the normal one but rather a group of normal healthy subjects with either an inherent or acquired relatively low CO2 response. The rebreathing technique is strongly advocated as a tool for investigating divers' CO2 sensitivity and its implications in underwater environments. Adult *Diving Human Hypercapnia/*etiology Male Pulmonary Ventilation Respiratory Function Tests/*methods
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org )
URI: PMID: 7385448
http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/2886
Date: 1980

Files in this item

Files Size Format View
7385448.pdf 2.029Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Undersea Biomedical Research Journal
    The Undersea Baromedical Research journal was published by the Undersea Medical Society, Inc. (now the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society) quarterly from 1974 to 1992 when the name changed to the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine Journal.

Show full item record

Browse

My Account