Delayed cerebral edema complicating cerebral arterial gas embolism: case histories

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Delayed cerebral edema complicating cerebral arterial gas embolism: case histories

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Title: Delayed cerebral edema complicating cerebral arterial gas embolism: case histories
Author: Pearson, RR; Goad, RF
Abstract: A disquieting and rarely described feature of the treatment of arterial gas embolism (AGE) is the high incidence of relapse following good to excellent initial responses to recompression therapy. This paper includes a discussion of the issues involved in the etiology and clinical approach to the specific problem of relapse and relates experience from selected clinical cases to a modified therapeutic approach that has been introduced into Royal Navy diving and submarine medicine practice. It illustrates how and why current treatment procedures have been expressly designed to minimize the incidence of relapse and to modify favorably the pathophysiological responses (particularly vasogenic cerebral edema) associated with cerebral AGE. Adult Brain Edema/complications/*etiology Decompression Decompression Sickness/complications/etiology Dexamethasone/*therapeutic use Diving/*adverse effects Embolism, Air/*complications/drug therapy/epidemiology/etiology/therapy Female Human Hyperbaric Oxygenation Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis/*complications/etiology Male Nitrogen/therapeutic use Oxygen Inhalation Therapy Recurrence Respiratory Therapy Retrospective Studies
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org )
URI: PMID: 7168093
http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/2938
Date: 1982

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  • Undersea Biomedical Research Journal
    The Undersea Baromedical Research journal was published by the Undersea Medical Society, Inc. (now the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society) quarterly from 1974 to 1992 when the name changed to the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine Journal.

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