[abstract] LASER DOPPLER BLOOD PERFUSION MONITOR (BPM) DATA COLLECTION FROM WITHIN A SECHRIST MONOPLACE HYPERBARIC CHAMBER

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[abstract] LASER DOPPLER BLOOD PERFUSION MONITOR (BPM) DATA COLLECTION FROM WITHIN A SECHRIST MONOPLACE HYPERBARIC CHAMBER

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Title: [abstract] LASER DOPPLER BLOOD PERFUSION MONITOR (BPM) DATA COLLECTION FROM WITHIN A SECHRIST MONOPLACE HYPERBARIC CHAMBER
Author: Haberstock, D; Howe, S; Weaver, LK
Abstract: BACKGROUND: BPM data (flow, volume and velocity) may be of use in assessment of wound perfusion, as a corollary to oxygenation, or as a useful investigative tool. Values indicate flow of blood directly beneath or adjacent to the optical sensor to a depth of 0.6 mm. We wished to examine BPM data and transcutaneous monitoring (TCM) data in an attempt to find any relationship that may be useful in determining oxygenation of tissues and the influence of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy on local perfusion. MATERIALS: LDS Hospital IRB approved the BPM use for normal subjects exposed to HBO2. A BPM (Vasamedics, St. Paul, MN) right ankle optical sensor 'cable' was passed through the hatch of a Sechrist monoplace hyperbaric chamber via a specially designed pass-through along with two Radiometer (Westlake, OH) Tina 3( sensors. Currently, five subjects have been exposed to HBO2 up to 3 atm abs. BPM data, TCM data and chamber pressure profiles were recorded by computer (Intel 386). The BPM site was generally within a few centimeters of the TCM sites. RESULTS: Chamber pressure, TCM data and subcutaneous microcirculation data were collected and graphed in the depicted case, flow, volume and velocity seemed to increase with the inhalation of air. CONCLUSIONS: (INSERT FIGURES) This study was a preliminary attempt to examine hyperbaric BPM flow data and interpret possible relationships with oxygenation. We found that the BPM probe could be used with no identified problems within the monoplace chamber. Interpretation of data is somewhat difficult. Microcirculation (site of the BPM measurement) changes could be due to changes in the tissue or blood PO2 to breathing through a demand regulator, or to other external influences (eg: ambient temperature, noise, movement, etc.). As expected, TCM values are directly influenced by the partial pressure of O2. Correlations of BPM values with TCM values are not obvious. We intend to continue investigations into BPM monitoring, attempting to draw causal relationships.
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org )
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/296
Date: 1997

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  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

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