Patterns of wet suit diving in Korean women breath-hold divers

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Patterns of wet suit diving in Korean women breath-hold divers

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Title: Patterns of wet suit diving in Korean women breath-hold divers
Author: Park, YS; Rahn, H; Lee, IS; Lee, SI; Kang, DH; Hong, SY; Hong, SK
Abstract: Work shifts, diving pattern, diving lung volumes, and counterweights were studied in professional Korean women breath-hold divers wearing wet suits. One of the major differences, compared with their diving pattern only a few years ago when wearing cotton suits, is the prolongation of the diving shifts from 70 to 180 min in the summer and 10 to 120 min in the winter. In sustained diving the average dive and surface times in a 5-m dive are 32 and 46 s, and in a 10-m dives, 43 and 85 s, respectively. During a 3-h shift the total bottom time for harvesting is 37 min in 5-m dives and 17 min in 10-m dives. Rates of descent and ascent are 0.55 and 0.84 m/s. The wet suit divers adjust their counterweights to obtain a 12percent positive buoyancy at the surface of sea water in contrast to the 8percent positive buoyancy of cotton suit divers. The average lung volumes before and after a dive are 79percent and 64percent of their vital capacities, values similar to those of previous cotton suit divers. Adaptation, Physiological *Diving Female Human Hypothermia/prevention & control Korea Lung Volume Measurements *Protective Clothing Seasons Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S. Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S. Time Factors Vital Capacity Work Schedule Tolerance
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org )
URI: PMID: 6636345
http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/2964
Date: 1983

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  • Undersea Biomedical Research Journal
    The Undersea Baromedical Research journal was published by the Undersea Medical Society, Inc. (now the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society) quarterly from 1974 to 1992 when the name changed to the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine Journal.

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