Central nervous system oxygen toxicity in closed circuit scuba divers II

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Central nervous system oxygen toxicity in closed circuit scuba divers II

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dc.contributor.author Butler Jr, FK en_US
dc.contributor.author Thalmann, ED en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2006-08-24T22:35:41Z
dc.date.available 2006-08-24T22:35:41Z
dc.date.issued 1986 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Undersea Biomed Res. 1986 Jun;13(2):193-223. en_US
dc.identifier.govdoc NEDU-1985-03
dc.identifier.other Undersea Biomed Res en_US
dc.identifier.uri PMID: 3727183 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/3045
dc.description Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org ) en_US
dc.description.abstract Central nervous system oxygen toxicity is currently the limiting factor in underwater swimming/diving operations using closed-circuit oxygen equipment. A dive series was conducted at the Navy Experimental Diving Unit in Panama City, FL, to determine whether these limits can be safely extended and also to evaluate the feasibility of making excursions to increased depth after a previous transit at a shallower depth for various lengths of time. A total of 465 man-dives were conducted on 14 different experimental profiles. In all, 33 episodes of oxygen toxicity were encountered, including 2 convulsions. Symptoms were classified as probable, definite, or convulsion. Findings were as follows: symptom classification is a useful tool in evaluating symptoms of oxygen toxicity; safe exposure limits should generally be adjusted only as a result of definite symptoms or convulsions; the following single-depth dive limits are proposed: 20 fsw (6.1 msw)--240 min, 25 fsw (7.6 msw)--240 min, 30 fsw (9.1 msw)--80 min, 35 fsw (10.7 msw)--25 min, 40 fsw (12.2 msw)--15 min, 50 fsw (15.2 msw)--10 min; a pre-exposure of up to 4 h at 20 fsw causes only a slight increase in the probability of an oxygen toxicity symptom on subsequent downward excursions; a pre-exposure depth of 25 fsw will have a more adverse effect on subsequent excursions than will 20 fsw; a return to 20 fsw for periods of 95-110 min seems to provide an adequate recovery period from an earlier excursion and enables a second excursion to be taken without additional hazard; nausea was the most commonly noted symptom of oxygen toxicity, followed by muscle twitching and dizziness; dives on which oxygen toxicity episodes were noted had a more rapid rate of core temperature cooling than dives without toxicity episodes; several divers who had passed the U.S. Navy Oxygen Tolerance Test were observed to be reproducibly more susceptible to oxygen toxicity than the other experimental divers. en_US
dc.format.extent 4372798 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.rights Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org ) en_US
dc.source.uri null en_US
dc.subject human en_US
dc.subject oxygen toxicity en_US
dc.subject Central nervous system en_US
dc.subject.mesh Adult Body Temperature Brain/*physiopathology Convulsions/etiology Diving/*adverse effects Dizziness/etiology Human Male Middle Aged Nausea/etiology Oxygen/*toxicity Oxygen Consumption Pressure Time Factors en_US
dc.title Central nervous system oxygen toxicity in closed circuit scuba divers II en_US

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This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Undersea Biomedical Research Journal
    The Undersea Baromedical Research journal was published by the Undersea Medical Society, Inc. (now the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society) quarterly from 1974 to 1992 when the name changed to the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine Journal.
  • Navy Experimental Diving Unit (NEDU)
    These are technical reports from the US Navy Experimental Diving Unit.

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