Visual reaction time performance preceding CNS oxygen toxicity

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Visual reaction time performance preceding CNS oxygen toxicity

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Title: Visual reaction time performance preceding CNS oxygen toxicity
Author: Curley, MD; Butler Jr, FK
Abstract: The visual reaction time performance of divers experiencing CNS oxygen toxicity was assessed during the development of closed-circuit 100percent oxygen breathing diving schedules at the U.S. Navy Experimental Diving Unit. Divers repeatedly performed the visual reaction time test of the Performance Measurement System (PMS) during multiple excursion dives. Each diver wore a Draeger LAR V UBA and performed moderate work on an underwater bicycle ergometer while engaged in the reaction time test. A single subject, repeated measures design was used. Six divers experienced 7 episodes of CNS oxygen toxicity while engaged in the visual reaction time test. Two episodes were preceded by a slowing and increase in variability of reaction time. Five episodes were not preceded by changes in reaction time performance. Other objective and subjective symptoms of toxicity experienced by the divers did not appear to be correlated with reaction time performance. Thus, the PMS visual reaction time test was not reliable method of detecting CNS oxygen toxicity in this study. Adult Central Nervous System/*drug effects Convulsions/chemically induced Diving/*adverse effects Female Human Male Oxygen/*poisoning Reaction Time/*physiology *Visual Perception
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org )
URI: PMID: 3629742
http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/3086
Date: 1987

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  • Undersea Biomedical Research Journal
    The Undersea Baromedical Research journal was published by the Undersea Medical Society, Inc. (now the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society) quarterly from 1974 to 1992 when the name changed to the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine Journal.

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