[abstract] THE PHYSIOLOGICAL COSTS OF OPERATING A ONE ATMOSPHERE DIVING SYSTEM.

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[abstract] THE PHYSIOLOGICAL COSTS OF OPERATING A ONE ATMOSPHERE DIVING SYSTEM.

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Title: [abstract] THE PHYSIOLOGICAL COSTS OF OPERATING A ONE ATMOSPHERE DIVING SYSTEM.
Author: Langworthy, HC; Bradley, ME; Bachrach, AJ
Abstract: We have assessed the physiological costs of operating a one atmosphere diving system (JIM) during performance of standardized tasks. By assessing the physiological status of these subjects each time the task was performed, we are able to estimate the degree of improvement in task performance and in efficiency as a result of learning and training. Our subjects were five male divers. Oxygen consumption (VO2, heart rate (HR), as well as other physiological parameters were measured at rest and during several levels of steady-state ergometric work on several occasions. During JIM operations, HR was measured under steady-state conditions of standardized task performance. These measurements were made the first time the task was performed as well as on subsequent occasions. Since in a given period, there is a linear relationship between VO2 and HR, the HR during JIM operations was used as a rough index of VO2 during task performance. When the subjects initially performed a certain task in JIM, work levels were heavy to very-heavy. For instance, walking in JIM at a brisk rate for the first time produced mean steady-state HR of 148 (range 132-162) which corresponds to an average VO2 ~ 2.23 L/min (range 1.85-2.6). Performance of tasks involving placing a shackle on a plate, alignment and bolting flanges, and transfer of a nut produced similar increases in HR, and by inference required similar energy costs. Deployment of a lift bag produced the highest HR (average 157, range 150-164), and the highest VO2's, ~2.7 L/min. Following performance of a specific task several times, there were significant decreases in HR (15-20 percent), and presumably also in VO2 ~20-30 percent. We interpret this decrease to represent an increase in efficiency resulting from learning/training/adaptation.
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/4564
Date: 1979

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  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

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