[abstract] A NEW INDEX FOR MONITORING OXYGEN POISONING IN THE LUNG.

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[abstract] A NEW INDEX FOR MONITORING OXYGEN POISONING IN THE LUNG.

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Title: [abstract] A NEW INDEX FOR MONITORING OXYGEN POISONING IN THE LUNG.
Author: Barrow, RE; Hills, BA; Sutton, T
Abstract: The use of elevated partial pressures of oxygen is undoubtedly a great benefit to the prevention and treatment of decompression sickness. In excessive amounts, however, O2 is not only toxic to the lungs but may compromise the capability of this organ to trap asymptomatic venous bubbles before they become arterial gas emboli. Hence it becomes particularly desirable to detect the onset of pulmonary oxygen toxicity and have a direct monitor which can be used not only with divers but also with experimental animals. In this study, the ratio of mid-inspiratory to midexpiratory flow (Vi/Ve) has been measured on rabbits subjected to various hyperbaric oxygen exposures. In previous studies of chemical insultus to the lung, this index has been shown to offer a good correlation with reduction in compliance, increased oedema and histopathological findings; while gross pathologic examination has confirmed the same tendency with oxygen. The (Vi/Ve) ratio therefore appears to be a very convenient index of pulmonary O2 toxicity and has the great advantage that it is independent of breathing frequency and can be applied with no conscious maneuver required on the part of the diver, patient or experimental animal. In normal rabbits the average value of this index is 0.88 and varies no more than 0.08. The index starts rising when the oxygen exposure exceeds 0.5 Atm and at 1.5 Atm, for example, reaches a value of 1.55 +/- 0.05 after 21 hrs. Death has occurred when the index reached 2.5. Upon return to normoxic conditions, the index immediately starts to decrease and continues to do so for another 3-4 hrs. After that, however, the index rises and reaches a peak value 30-50 hrs following return to normoxic conditions. The peak value is variable but often far exceeds the rise initially induced by oxygen breathing. This has serious implications concerning repetitive dives following high oxygen exposures.
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/4732
Date: 1979

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  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

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