[abstract] A TEN YEAR REVIEW OF EMPLOYEE HYPERBARIC EXPOSURES.

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[abstract] A TEN YEAR REVIEW OF EMPLOYEE HYPERBARIC EXPOSURES.

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dc.contributor.author Mosteller, JA
dc.contributor.author Reich, D
dc.contributor.author Harrington, N
dc.contributor.author Rekow, G
dc.contributor.author Jacobsen, B
dc.contributor.author Powers, A
dc.contributor.author Neuman, TS
dc.date.accessioned 2008-01-17T03:24:08Z
dc.date.available 2008-01-17T03:24:08Z
dc.date.issued 1994
dc.identifier.uri http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/5622
dc.description Abstract of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. Annual Scientific Meeting held June 22-26, 1994. Westin Hotel, Denver, Colorado (http://www.uhms.org) en
dc.description.abstract Anecdotal reports of decompression illness in hospital employees at the 1992 UHMS safety conference prompted the USCD staff to analyze its experience for the past ten years. All exposures from UCSD's hyperbaric program, from its inception on January 1, 1984, through December 31, 1993, were examined for incidence of decompression illness. The hyperbaric exposures were examined for the following: gender, experience, maximum pressure, total bottom time, total decompression time, total time of dive, decompression stops, repetitive dives, surface interval, and oxygen breathing time. Since 1984 a total of 169 employees were pressurized 9,666 times. The maximum depth was 165 fsw although the majority of dives were performed at 45 fsw. UCSD did not experience a single incident of decompression sickness or arterial gas embolism in its staff members. There are several possible explanations for the excellent safety record. US Navy dive tables, and US Navy treatment tables were used as basic templates for all dive operations. Nitrogen uptake was reduced and nitrogen off-gassing was expedited by routine oxygen breathing at depth. decompression stops, when needed, were routinely lengthened by SO% and enhanced by oxygen breathing. The 4S fsw dives required 15 minutes of oxygen breathing for bottom times of 90 to 119 minutes and 30 minutes for bottom times greater than 119 minutes. As an added safety consideration, repetitive dive groups. were calculated as if no oxygen breathing had occurred. Ascent and descent rates were varied by were considerably slower than Navy tolerances. Considering the large number of exposures and the variety of participants we conclude the UCSD model is a safe method for staff exposures in a medical hyperbaric center. en
dc.format.extent 259 bytes
dc.format.mimetype text/plain
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. en
dc.subject Hyperbaric Chamber en
dc.subject Hyperbaric conditions en
dc.subject EXPOSURE(GENERAL) en
dc.subject tender en
dc.subject attendant en
dc.subject Decompression Illness en
dc.subject Occupational Exposure en
dc.title [abstract] A TEN YEAR REVIEW OF EMPLOYEE HYPERBARIC EXPOSURES. en
dc.type Other en

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  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

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