[abstract] DIVING EXPERIENCE AND ANTHROPOMETRY ASSOCIATED WITH OUT-OF-AIR, BUOYANCY TROUBLE, AND RAPID ASCENT.

Rubicon Research Repository/Manakin Repository

[abstract] DIVING EXPERIENCE AND ANTHROPOMETRY ASSOCIATED WITH OUT-OF-AIR, BUOYANCY TROUBLE, AND RAPID ASCENT.

Show simple item record


dc.contributor.author Buzzacott, P
dc.contributor.author Denoble, PJ
dc.contributor.author Vann, RD
dc.date.accessioned 2008-10-27T14:19:54Z
dc.date.available 2008-10-27T14:19:54Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation Undersea Hyperb Med. 2008 July-Aug;35(4) en
dc.identifier.issn 1066-2936
dc.identifier.uri http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/7807
dc.description Abstract of the Undersea & Hyperbaric Medical Society 2008 Annual Scientific Meeting June 26-28, 2008 Salt Lake City Marriott Downtown, Salt Lake City, Utah. en
dc.description.abstract INTRODUCTION: DAN’s Project Dive Exploration (PDE) collects data regarding demographics, diving experience, recorded depth-time profiles, and reported problems. We report human factors associated with out-of-air, buoyancy trouble, and rapid ascent (>60 fsw/min). METHODS: From 1991-2004, PDE collected 56,205 dives by 5,374 divers. Rates of ascent to the surface were calculated from recorded profiles. Human factors were tested by logistic regression (p<0.05) for association with out-of-air, buoyancy trouble, and rapid ascent. RESULTS: Running out of air was reported by 72 divers (0.014%), buoyancy trouble by 266 divers (0.053%), and rapid ascent by 251 divers (0.050%). Recorded dive profiles indicated 215 divers (0.043%) made at least one rapid ascent, 39 of which (18%) were self-reported. Out-of-air was significantly associated with older divers (p<0.01), female gender (p<0.01), and lower certification (p=0.03). Buoyancy trouble was associated with female gender (p<0.01), number of reported medical conditions (p=0.01), and a low number of dives during the last five years (p=0.04). Rapid ascent was associated with younger divers (p<0.01) and higher certification (p<0.01). A recorded ascent faster than 60 fsw/min for at least 20 fsw was associated with younger divers (p<0.01) and higher certification (p=0.01). DISCUSSION: Rapid ascent was reported much less often than recorded, but recorded rapid ascent was rare. Out-of-air, buoyancy trouble, and rapid ascent were associated with gender, experience, and certification level. en
dc.description.sponsorship DAN en
dc.format.extent 193 bytes
dc.format.mimetype text/plain
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. en
dc.subject DIVING en
dc.subject ACCIDENTS en
dc.subject Project Dive Exploration en
dc.subject experience en
dc.subject dive profile recording en
dc.subject Incident en
dc.subject out-of-air en
dc.subject buoyancy trouble en
dc.subject rapid ascent en
dc.subject Humans en
dc.subject gender en
dc.subject FEMALES en
dc.subject age en
dc.subject certification level en
dc.title [abstract] DIVING EXPERIENCE AND ANTHROPOMETRY ASSOCIATED WITH OUT-OF-AIR, BUOYANCY TROUBLE, AND RAPID ASCENT. en
dc.type Article en

Files in this item

Files Size Format View
abstract.txt 193bytes Text file View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

Show simple item record

Browse

My Account