[abstract] COULD THE U.S. NAVY BENEFIT FROM TECHNICAL DIVING TECHNIQUES?

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[abstract] COULD THE U.S. NAVY BENEFIT FROM TECHNICAL DIVING TECHNIQUES?

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Title: [abstract] COULD THE U.S. NAVY BENEFIT FROM TECHNICAL DIVING TECHNIQUES?
Author: Dituri, J; Parsley, K; Hamilton Jr, RW; Whelan, HT
Abstract: BACKGROUND. Conventional U.S. Navy deep “bounce” diving with air requires a massive amount of equipment and a large surface platform, takes time to deploy, is expensive, and is generally limited to a depth of 300 feet of sea water (fsw; about 100 metres). The recreational diving community has developed a new method known as “technical diving” that allows access to this range using fewer resources. METHODS. A refined method of technical trimix diving using constant PO2 rebreathers can improve decompression substantially, in part by a constant and near-optimal oxygen level, and by use of nitrogen as well as helium inert gas. Other benefits are use of efficient, real-time, custom-designed decompression protocols that take advantage of deeper stops. Chamber support can be with portable, inflatable chambers, using rebreathers to supply moist oxygen. Dry suits provide effective thermal protection, and full-face masks will avoid catastrophe in the event of an oxygen convulsion and facilitate through-water communications. Dive teams are well trained, with equipment redundancy and mutual support that includes “buddies,” topside management, and surface and intermediate support divers. RESULTS. Extensive, worldwide experience shows the “state of the art” to be at least 300 fsw (100 msw), but this can be extended to 500 fsw (150 msw) with special care including appropriate training, procedures, and support. Dives that can be done with this technology include short-duration dives with light work such as inspection, exploration, body recovery, rescue (e.g., the Kursk scenario), scientific investigations, archaeology (the Monitor was fully surveyed by technical divers before the Navy went to work there), etc. CONCLUSIONS. USN could employ technical diving techniques for some jobs with much faster response and at lower cost. This would fit well with USN’s conversion from “blue water” to “brown water” warfare.
Description: Abstract of the Undersea & Hyperbaric Medical Society 2008 Annual Scientific Meeting June 26-28, 2008 Salt Lake City Marriott Downtown, Salt Lake City, Utah.
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/7809
Date: 2008

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  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

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