Flight Surgeon Support to United States Air Force Fliers in Combat.

Show simple item record


dc.contributor.author Jones, DR
dc.contributor.author Marsh, RW
dc.date.accessioned 2009-03-03T14:54:11Z
dc.date.available 2009-03-03T14:54:11Z
dc.date.issued 2003
dc.identifier.citation ADA422017 en
dc.identifier.govdoc ADA422017
dc.identifier.govdoc SAM/CSD-TR-2003-0001
dc.identifier.govdoc SAM-FE-BR-TR-2003-0001
dc.identifier.uri http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/7974
dc.description Citation Status: Active; Citation Classification: Unclassified; Title Classification: Unclassified; Report Classification: Unclassified; Identifier Classification: Unclassified; Abstract Classification: Unclassified; Distribution Limitation(s): 01 - APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; Information provided by the Department of Defense and the Defense Technical Information Center (http://www.dtic.mil/) is considered public information and may be distributed or copied unless otherwise specified. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested. en
dc.description.abstract The everyday practice and operational applications of U.S. Air Force flight medicine by its flight surgeons at the end of the 20th century comprise a system of medical care and support that is unique in human history. This system of preventive, occupational, clinical and participatory medicine seems so natural that modern aviators and flight surgeons may take it for granted, having little understanding of the manner in which it developed and matured. Yet, one may fairly argue that military aviation as we know it today would not be possible without its flight surgeons. Herein lies an in-depth review and analysis of the role of the flight surgeon in combat operations from an academic and historical point of view. This report provides a rich source of information both for novice flight surgeons and for their experienced colleagues, as well as a historical record, a detailed bibliography and a summary of the lessons hard-learned in past conflicts. Examples of the consequences of not providing aeromedical services provide a clear justification for the existence of the flight surgeon system and may prove useful in times of cutbacks in personnel and funding. The record clearly demonstrates that physicians trained in the principles of aviation medicine and assigned to flying units to care for the fliers contribute in specific ways to unit safety and effectiveness. Acknowledging the significant and notable contributions to flight medicine made by our aeromedical colleagues in the Navy and in the post-1949 Army, this report focuses on Army flight medicine prior to 1949 and Air Force flight medicine subsequent to 1949. en
dc.description.sponsorship US AIR FORCE en
dc.format.extent 14979981 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher SCHOOL OF AEROSPACE MEDICINE BROOKS AFB TX en
dc.subject AVIATION MEDICINE en
dc.subject FLIGHT SURGEONS en
dc.subject MILITARY HISTORY en
dc.subject LESSONS LEARNED en
dc.subject COMBAT READINESS en
dc.subject PILOTS en
dc.subject MILITARY MEDICINE en
dc.subject AEROSPACE MEDICINE en
dc.subject PREVENTIVE MEDICINE en
dc.subject FLYING SAFETY en
dc.subject UNIT EFFECTIVENESS en
dc.subject COMBAT FATIGUE en
dc.subject DEPLOYMENT en
dc.subject MILITARY FLIGHT OPERATIONS en
dc.subject AVIATION HISTORY en
dc.title Flight Surgeon Support to United States Air Force Fliers in Combat. en
dc.type Article en

Files in this item

Files Size Format View
ADA422017.pdf 14.28Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Browse

My Account