The history and future of archaeological and paleontological work at Wakulla Springs (8WA24).

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The history and future of archaeological and paleontological work at Wakulla Springs (8WA24).

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Title: The history and future of archaeological and paleontological work at Wakulla Springs (8WA24).
Author: Gerrell, PR
Abstract: Wakulla Springs, a first magnitude spring, produces over 183 million gallons of water a day; in comparison, the City of Tallahassee uses between 28 and 32 million gallons. The spring has a reported depth of over 270 ft, making it one of the largest single fissure spring in the world. During the past six decades, scientific studies of the spring have been conducted by the Florida Geological Survey in 1930, 1955, 1956, and 1962. Dr. Herman Gunter, a geologist with the State of Florida, conducted the 1930 study. Mr. Stanley J. Olsen, a paleontologist, conducted the 1955, 1956, and 1962 studies. These scientific studies produced extinct pleistocene megafauna. In addition Olsen's studies produced cultural material such as bone and ivory pins, projectile points, and flint scrapers. Unfortunately, no systematic field controls were used in the recovery, therefore, no data for the association between faunal and cultural material could be determined. The future of scientific research at the spring will now rest with the State of Florida; on October 1, 1986, the Department of Natural Resources will responsibility for maintaining the cultural resources at the spring. The opinion of state archaeologists, as well as my own, is that cultural and faunal material in the deep cave should be left undisturbed since the recovery of this material would entail a large and extensive dive operation which at this time could not be undertaken. Wakulla Springs should be maintained as a foremost archaeological site, both for underwater and terrestrial study. All diving activities should be restricted to those institutions having a scientific and professional interest in the spring; otherwise, we run the risk of losing much in the way of cultural resources.
Description: American Academy of Underwater Sciences (http://www.aaus.org/)
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/9072
Date: 1987

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