History and regulation of scientific diving in Australia.

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History and regulation of scientific diving in Australia.

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Title: History and regulation of scientific diving in Australia.
Author: Drew, EA
Abstract: Introduction: The first scientific diving in Australia was carried out under the direction of Sir Maurice Yonge at Low Isles during the 1928-1929 Great Barrier Reef Expedition. They used the diving helmet, a piece of equipment initially developed by a Paris fire chief to allow access to smoke-filled buildings. and subsequently used by Professor Milne-Edwards to study marine biology down to 7.5 m (25 ft) in Sicily in 1856. Similar equipment was used in the Caribbean in the 1920's by William Beebe to depths of 18 m (60 ft) and was still being used by Jack Kitching to study kelp in Scotland in 1940. Although the aqualung was brought to Australia in 1952, early scientific diving work by our Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) in 1957 to study the pearl beds of northern Australia used Greek sponge divers with hard-hat diving equipment. Indeed, scientific diving in conjunction with both the pearl and abalone industries in Australia still uses the same equipment as the commercial operators in those industries, namely, hookah diving. Initially, use of the aqualung was restricted to recreational spear fishermen, but scuba-based scientific diving in Australia began in the late 1950's and blossomed during the 60's.
Description: American Academy of Underwater Sciences (http://www.aaus.org/)
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/9325
Date: 1991

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